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Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: Le Bossu de Notre-Dame [Walt Disney - 1996]
Dash

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Rechercher dans: Les Films d'Animation   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: Le Bossu de Notre-Dame [Walt Disney - 1996]    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Lun 21 Juin 2021 - 23:50
Passionnant article du New York Times aujourd'hui :
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/21/movies/the-hunchback-of-notre-dame.html

Je vous colle le texte au cas où vous ne pouvez le lire sur la page originale.

Citation :
‘The Hunchback of Notre Dame’ at 25: ‘The Most R-Rated G You Will Ever See’
How did the ratings board overlook songs filled with lust and damnation? “Maybe we bamboozled them with gargoyles,” one filmmaker said.

Image
The movie morphed from the very dark story in the novel to a fantasy world imagined by Quasimodo (voiced by Tom Hulce).Credit...Disney

They know exactly what they got away with.

“That’s the most R-rated G you will ever see in your life,” said Tab Murphy, a screenwriter of Disney’s animated “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” which was released 25 years ago this month.

“Thousands of dollars must have changed hands somewhere, I’m sure,” joked Gary Trousdale, who directed the film with Kirk Wise.

However it came about, a ratings board made up of parents decided that a film with a musical number about lust and hellfire and a plot that involves the threat of genocide against Gypsies was appropriate for a general audience.

Maybe the reason had to do with the studio: Nearly all of Disney’s hand-drawn animated movies had been rated G up to that point. Maybe it was the marketing, which presented “Hunchback” as a complete departure from the dark Victor Hugo novel on which it was based, reframing it as a carnival with the tagline “Join the party!” Maybe the higher-ups at Disney exerted pressure, convinced a PG rating would hurt the box office take. (“It was a G rating or bust,” Wise said.)

But the fact that what is arguably Disney’s darkest animated movie earned a rating on par with “Cinderella” reflects the subjectivity of the rating system — and how much parents’ tastes have changed over the years.

“PG today is the equivalent of what G was in the 1990s,” Wise said.

Trousdale added, “Nowadays, you can’t even smoke in a G film.”

But one scene in particular defies explanation.

“That ‘Hellfire’ sequence?” Murphy said, referring to the Stephen Schwartz-Alan Menken song sung by Judge Claude Frollo about his conflict between piety and lust for Esmeralda. “Come on, man. Come on.”

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Talking gargoyles were added to lighten the story. Credit...Disney

MURPHY HAD LONG WANTED to adapt the 1831 Gothic story of Esmeralda, a beautiful Roma girl who captures the hearts of several Parisian men, including Quasimodo, a bell-ringer with a severe hunchback whom Hugo describes as “hideous” and “a devil of a man.”

But then he realized what he’d gotten himself into.

“I was like, ‘Oh, God, I don’t want to write a singing, dancing, watered-down film that turns this amazing piece of world literature into a typical Disney movie,’” he said.

But, he said, it was to the credit of Walt Disney Company executives at the time, Roy E. Disney and Michael D. Eisner, that they took a hands-off approach.

“I was never told to stay away from this or that or you can’t do this,” he said. “They were like, ‘You write the story you want to tell, and let us worry about our brand.’”

Of course, the Hugo novel, in which many major characters die at the end, was “too depressing” for a Disney film. So Murphy had to get creative.

He decided the story would focus on the colorful fantasy world Quasimodo imagines while stuck in his bell tower. There’d be a festival. Talking gargoyles. A hero to root for.

Instead of Quasimodo (voiced by Tom Hulce) being whipped on the pillory, he’s pelted with vegetables and humiliated at the Feast of Fools. Hugo’s troubled archdeacon, Claude Frollo (Tony Jay), became an evil magistrate. Disney did not want to take on the church, Trousdale said. Unlike in the novel, Esmeralda (Demi Moore) is saved by Quasimodo and the dashing Phoebus (Kevin Kline), the rebel captain of the guards. All three live happily ever after instead of dying, as both Quasimodo and Esmeralda do in the book.

But, Wise said, there was always one looming issue they had to deal with: Frollo’s lust for Esmeralda.

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The screenwriters had to figure out how to deal with Frollo’s lust for Esmeralda. Credit...Disney

“We knew that was going to be a really delicate topic,” he said. “But we also knew we had to tell that story, because it’s key to the central love rectangle.”

At first, Murphy tried to tackle it in words.

“I’d originally written a monologue for that scene that was filled with lots of subtext showing that his anger was all about his forbidden lust for her,” Murphy said. “But then Stephen and Alan said, ‘We think that can be a great song.’”

Six months later, a small package from Schwartz, who wrote the lyrics, and Menken, who composed the score, arrived at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, Calif. Inside was a cassette with a new song.

Murphy, Trousdale, Wise and Don Hahn, the film’s producer, gathered in an office, popped the tape into a cassette player and pressed play — and realized what they were hearing.

In a crashing percussive number, Frollo, backed by a choir chanting in Latin, agonizes over his lust and his religious faith and his hatred of the Roma.

“This burning desire,” he sings in the film, rubbing her scarf sensuously against his face, “is turning me to sin.” (Schwartz sang the part on the demo.)

“I swear to God, everyone’s jaw slowly started to drop open,” Murphy said. “At the end of it, Kirk reached over, clicked off the cassette player, sat back, crossed his arms, and said, ‘Well, that’s never going to make it into the movie.’ And it did!”

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Initially the filmmakers imagined Frollo’s lust would be subtext. Instead he wound up singing about his “burning desire.”Credit...Disney

THOUGH IT WAS NEVER STATED EXPLICITLY, Wise said a G rating was the expectation.

“The studio felt anything above a G would threaten the film’s box office,” he said. “This was before ‘Shrek,’ or movies that made a PG rating in animation commonplace.”

A G-rated film, according to the Motion Picture Association of America system, which was introduced in 1968, “contains nothing in theme, language, nudity, sex, violence or other matters that, in the view of the Rating Board, would offend parents whose younger children view the motion picture.” Some snippets of language, it says, “may go beyond polite conversation but they are common everyday expressions.”

“We never thought we’d get away with the term ‘hellfire,’” Trousdale said.

The first cut of “Hunchback” indeed didn’t pass muster for a G — but it wasn’t the use of the word “hell” or “damnation” that the board took issue with.

It was the sound effects.

In the “Hellfire” number, imagined as a nightmarish, hallucinogenic sequence, Frollo is tormented by hooded, red-robed figures that reflect his slipping grip on reality.

“This burning desire,” he sings, gazing at a dancing Esmeralda figure in his fireplace, “is turning me to sin.”

The ratings board was uncomfortable with the word “sin,” Trousdale said. But the sequence was already animated, and the soundtrack recorded, so they couldn’t change the lyric.

Then Hahn came up with a solution: Make the “Whoosh!” when the hooded judges rush up from the floor a little louder so it would drown out the “sin.” It worked, Trousdale said.

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The sound effects seemed to trouble the ratings board more than the language in the “Hellfire” sequence.Credit...Disney

But what ultimately got the film its G rating, Wise said, was a change so tiny that “you’ll never believe this.”

In the scene where Frollo sneaks up behind Esmeralda and sniffs her hair, the ratings board thought the sniff was “too suggestive,” he said.

“They were like, ‘Could you lower the volume of that?’” he said. “And we did, and it got the G rating.”

NEITHER THE POSTERS nor the trailers hinted at the darker themes.

“There was definitely a huuuuuge effort to emphasize the lighthearted aspects of ‘Hunchback,’” Menken said, laughing.

The film’s tagline? “Join the party!”

“Maybe that was the right campaign for the studio to get people in the theater,” Hahn said. “But I’m sure I wouldn’t do that today — I think there’s a truth-in-advertising responsibility that perhaps we overlooked back then.”

When the film, which cost $70 million to make before marketing, opened on June 21, 1996, it was a bit of a disappointment at the box office, grossing about $100.1 million domestically. Trousdale said they did get some pushback from parents’ groups about the G rating.

“They were saying ‘You tricked us; you deceived us,’” he said. “The marketing was all the happy stuff and ‘Come to the Feast of Fools; it’s a party!’ with talking gargoyles, confetti and pies in the face. And then that wasn’t the film, and people were really pissed off.”

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Parents’ groups complained that the marketing emphasis on talking gargoyles and other fun elements was misleading.Credit...Disney

Tom Zigo, a spokesman for the Classification and Rating Administration, which administers the rating system, said that he could not speak about the specifics of the “Hunchback” G, but that it was “very possible” that a movie rated 25 years ago would receive a different rating today.

Hahn, Menken, Murphy, Trousdale and Wise all agreed there would be no chance of the film getting a G rating today — or even, Murphy suggested, being made at all.

“Disney was willing to take some chances in that movie that I don’t think they’d take today,” he said. “That’s a PG-13 in my book.”

Yet the movie has stood the test of time — Frollo, Wise noted, feels like a “very contemporary” villain in the #MeToo era — and remains a favorite among young adults who rewatch and discover references they missed the first time around.

“I’ve read posts on fan pages from a few fans in their mid-20s and 30s who were pretty young when they saw this,” Trousdale said. “They’re like, ‘Yeah, this just messed me up when I saw it as a kid, but I still love it.’”

Menken said “Hellfire” pushed the envelope more in terms of what Disney does than any song he’s ever written.

“Maybe, in retrospect, ‘Hunchback’ was a bridge too far,” he said. “But God, am I glad they took that bridge too far.”
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: Artistes et Animateurs de Disney : Archives, anecdotes et actualités
L'Oncle Walt

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Rechercher dans: Les Films d'Animation   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: Artistes et Animateurs de Disney : Archives, anecdotes et actualités    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Jeu 7 Jan 2021 - 23:27
Interviewé par The Hollywood Reporter, Pete Docter évoque l'avenir qui attend Pixar, la production de Soul ainsi que sa position de CCO.
On y apprend notamment que Aphton Corbin (story artist sur Toy Story 4) et Rosana Sullivan (réalisatrice de Kitbull) développement actuellement leurs propres films, chacune de leur côté, pour de futures sorties au cinéma (donc sûrement vers 2023/2024).
Docter annonce également que si beaucoup d'histoires originales arrivent bientôt dans les salles, il va falloir s'attendre à ce que d'autres suites soient commandées pour cause de sécurité financière.

Citation :
After John Lasseter's exit, the 'Soul' co-director has reinvigorated Disney's multibillion-dollar Oscar-winning powerhouse by ushering in a new diverse generation of filmmakers and projects.
In June of 2018, then Disney CEO Bob Iger summoned Pete Docter from the Pixar Animation Studios campus in Emeryville, California, to Disney's corporate headquarters in Burbank — a building fronted by 19-foot sculptures of characters from Snow White — for a conversation that would seem to be a career pinnacle for any modern animator. For Docter, however, the moment was fraught. "I go down there into that giant building with the dwarves on it and push the elevator button," Docter says. "I had a suspicion of what he wanted to talk about, and it just hit me. I will be honest, there was a little bit of dread."

For the previous six months, Pixar, the studio Docter had joined in 1990 as its third animator the day after he graduated from CalArts, had been operating without its founding creative leader, John Lasseter. In November of 2017, Lasseter had taken what was being called a sabbatical from the studio after writing a letter apologizing for unspecified "missteps" amid allegations of unwanted touching. In the resulting tumult, Docter was trying to stay focused on directing an ambitious new film, Soul, after Disney had just accelerated the release date by six months, while also serving on a leadership team convened to keep the studio running in Lasseter's absence. An introvert who had only ever really wanted to sit at a desk and animate since he was 8, Docter realized as he was riding up in the elevator to Iger's office that day that he was about to be offered an extraordinary opportunity, to step into Lasseter's job running a studio that has grossed $14.5 billion at the box office, won 21 Oscars and helped revolutionize its art form.

"I did wonder, 'If I say no, what happens?' I don't want to seem too self-aggrandizing here, but I wasn't sure who else would do it. And so I said yes," says Docter, 52, speaking by Zoom from his home in Piedmont, California, in mid-December. Since Pixar moved to working from home, Docter has been using his grown son's old bedroom as his office, and there are artifacts of teen life, including a collection of stickers from burrito wrappers, scattered around him.

Nineteen months into taking the job, Docter is ushering in a new, more diverse generation of filmmakers at the studio, developing a pipeline of projects to feed Disney's 13-month-old streaming service, Disney+, and grappling with taking the place of the complicated, larger-than-life figure that Lasseter represented at Pixar. More than any studio executive since Walt Disney, Lasseter was personally associated with the movies his company made, projecting a public persona of a friendly genius in a Hawaiian shirt responsible for Pixar's unbroken string of critical and commercial successes. Lasseter's departure during the heat of the #MeToo movement punctured that myth and left Pixar employees anxious and adrift. Since taking the job, Docter has been trying to evolve the company while holding on to the principles of creative risk-taking that enabled him to direct some of the studio's most inventive movies — Inside Out; Up; Monsters, Inc. and Soul, which premiered on Disney+ over Christmas.

Soul, made with co-director Kemp Powers, features Pixar's first Black protagonist, a jazz pianist who confronts a typically Docterian existential question: What is the meaning of life? Docter first conceived the idea after his success on Inside Out, which made $857.6 million in 2015 and won the animated feature Oscar. "I started wondering, 'I don't know if it's going to get better than that, so why is it that I still don't feel like everything's buttoned up and fixed in my life?' " he says. " 'It didn't fix everything. Is there something more I should be doing?' "

For all of Docter's trepidation about taking Pixar's top job, the animator was always Lasseter's heir apparent, according to Ed Catmull, the computer scientist who co-founded Pixar with Steve Jobs in 1986 as a spinoff of Lucasfilm's computer division and retired as president of Pixar and Disney Animation in 2019. "John had picked him as his successor quite a while ago," Catmull says. "Pete was the next leader, the one that's highly loved. I don't think we talked a lot about it, but it wasn't a secret that Pete was the one who would step in if something happened to John." Partly that was because over the years, Docter seemed to wear the mantle of responsibility for Pixar in a personal way. "Among everybody, when things were starting to go off the rails, which happens frequently, Pete was the first one in my office concerned about it," Catmull says. And while some of his peers like Andrew Stanton and Brad Bird also wanted to make live-action films, Docter was an animation loyalist. "You cut Pete open and inside is a ride from Disneyland and a scene from Lady and the Tramp," says Stanton. "He just fricking loves animation at its very core."

Iger agreed that Docter was ideal for the job. "Pete is a gifted artist and storyteller," he said in an email. "He also has a giant heart, whose guiding leadership principles are kindness, empathy and integrity."

When Docter took over as chief creative officer, Catmull says, the animator was worried that his more deliberative temperament might not be suitable for such a big job. "Pete came to me once after he had the position and he said he didn't feel right, because he doesn't have the same kind of presence in the room that John had," Catmull says. Lasseter was gregarious — with a take-over-the-room style. "I said, 'No, and you shouldn't. People look up to you because you're thoughtful, you encourage other people, you have a different style, and that's who you should be.' But his worry was, 'Can I fill the shoes?' "

Lasseter had been more than a boss to Docter — he was also a mentor, friend and groomsman at his wedding. Docter says he has communicated with Lasseter since he left Pixar, but declines to say more. Lasseter, who is now running Skydance Animation, which is scheduled to release its first film, Spellbound, in November, declined to comment for this piece. When Lasseter left, according to Docter's wife, Amanda, "Pete went through what everybody went through. He was confused. He was hurt. He wasn't sure what to say, wasn't sure what not to say. Those times were so hot, that it was just best to keep your mouth shut." Docter describes the period as "scary." "[Lasseter] had been such a formative part of the studio," he says. "When he stepped out, everybody was left with our heads spinning, unsure really how to progress."

To the outside world, Pixar had largely been defined by Lasseter's influence. Inside the studio, however, many say his role had diminished since Disney bought Pixar for $7.4 billion in 2006 and he had taken on the additional responsibilities of running Walt Disney Animation Studios, which is now headed by Jennifer Lee, and advising the theme parks division. The perception of Lasseter as a great and powerful Oz inside Pixar was inaccurate, say insiders. "It wasn't completely the truth of how that studio ran all along," says Stanton. "There were many names and systems and protocols that made something so huge run. It took a hit and it adjusted."

Still, there were plenty of reasons for Docter to be anxious when Lasseter departed, including the example of Disney after Walt Disney's death in 1966, when the studio largely abandoned animation for 20 years. "It was uncharted territory," Stanton says. "When Walt died, they kind of just limped along and then fell apart until the late '80s. And so, we didn't have a model to follow. Nobody to advise. The only thing that we all understood was that [the current leadership] is not going to be around forever, so let's stop trying to make ourselves essential. If we do our jobs, we will become obsolete. It's almost like smart, healthy parenting. It's bittersweet, but it's the right thing to do if you really truly care about the studio itself."

Among the issues that Lasseter's messy departure brought to the fore was the unequal role of women at Pixar. In the 22 years since Toy Story was released, the company had only had one female feature director, Brenda Chapman, whom Lasseter fired from her movie, 2012's Brave, over creative differences. Pixar's vaunted brain trust — the creative leaders who shape the studio's movies in candid notes sessions — was predominantly made up of its past directors, people like Docter, Stanton and Lee Unkrich. "If you only have male directors, then the only people sitting around that table are male," says Lindsey Collins, who produced WALL·E and Finding Dory and is producing Turning Red, a 2022 film directed by Domee Shi that will be the studio's first feature from a female filmmaker since Chapman left. "There just weren't a lot of women in general," says Shi of starting at Pixar as an intern in 2011. "The women I did meet, I clung to like we were two people on a raft, like, 'Oh awesome, another nerdy animation girl.' " Women at the studio had been quietly pushing for change from within for years. On her own, on the 2017 film Cars 3, script supervisor Jessica Heidt had started tracking how many spoken roles went to male characters versus females and presenting the data to filmmakers after their brain trust screenings. "She would just put a piece of paper on the director's desk and say, 'Here's what's happening,' " Docter says. "And you'd go, 'Holy cow. Eighty percent of these lines are males. I wasn't aware of that. I didn't do that intentionally.' So just exposing these blind spots and allowing us to fix it."

Docter had been an advocate for Shi since well before he took the CCO job and played a pivotal role in her career when she was pitching a short film to a room of Pixar executives. Shi had told Docter about the idea when it was a side project she was pursuing while working as one of his story artists: Bao, a film about a lonely Chinese Canadian mother suffering from empty nest syndrome who gets a second chance at motherhood when she makes a steamed bun that comes to life. After hearing feedback from colleagues, Shi had altered the idea in hopes of getting it made as an official Pixar short, ditching the original ending where the mother eats the dumpling. When she pitched the revised idea to the group of Pixar leaders, "I remember Pete standing up and being like, 'That's not the version you pitched me,' " Shi says. "I was like, 'Sorry, I changed it because I thought it'd be too dark for Pixar, too weird.' He turns to the panel and he was like, 'The original version she pitched was awesome, you guys should see that.' " Shi was given a second chance to pitch, the group greenlit her short and Bao went on to win best animated short at the Oscars, with the weird ending.

When Docter ascended to the Pixar leadership role, he and Pixar president Jim Morris formalized the creative advisory teams that had been running the studio during Lasseter's sabbatical, with a commitment to keep them 50 percent female and diversified in terms of age, race and ethnicity. That meant involving the studio's producers, a group with many more women, as well inviting story artists, animators and short filmmakers. There are more female directors on the way: In addition to Shi, Aphton Corbin and Rosana Sullivan are female story artists who have directed short films at the studio recently and are now moving into development on features.

In building Soul around a Black protagonist, pianist Joe Gardner, Docter was also breaking with the studio's past of telling stories around predominantly white lead characters, save for the Mexico-set Coco (Docter's Up also featured an Asian American boy). The idea originated after Docter, who plays stand-up bass and whose siblings and parents all have careers in music, decided that jazz was an ideal metaphor for the improvisation of life he wanted to explore in the film, and he would make his lead character a jazz musician. "One of our [music] consultants said, 'Well, if you want to be accurate, jazz should really be called Black improvisational music,' " Docter says. "And so we thought, 'This character should be Black.' The longer we lived with it the more I realized, 'This is a bigger issue than the decision that I thought it was. We need help with this.' " Pixar enlisted Powers, who had written the play One Night in Miami (now an awards-contending Amazon Studios movie directed by Regina King) and co-written five episodes of Star Trek: Discovery, before ultimately elevating him to be the studio's first Black co-director.

Powers says he felt that part of his role was to bolster the Gardner character, voiced by Jamie Foxx. The role initially had been written as secondary to 22, a cynical soul Joe meets when he dies, voiced by Tina Fey. "It felt incredibly sincere," Powers says of Docter's interest in getting Joe Gardner right. "It felt outside of Hollywood. I don't think there's an insincere bone in the guy's body." After 30 years at Pixar, Docter was used to taking blunt criticism about his work, but race was new terrain. "A number of people gave me feedback like, 'You seem really scared to talk about race issues,' " Docter says. "I am, because I'm afraid I'm going to stick my foot in my mouth and say something dumb and offend somebody. I did along the way, without knowing it, and I learned from other people's mistakes as well." Among the tropes Docter unwittingly replicated was that of Black characters in animated movies getting body-swapped out of their bodies, which occurs in Disney's The Princess and the Frog and Blue Sky Studios' Spies in Disguise. Although a body-swap element (with a cat) remains in Soul, Powers advocated for it to be diminished in the story, so that Joe retains agency as a character in key emotional scenes, including one with his mother. "The hope is that even though Joe's not in his body, we see his body," Docter says, "while spending time in the spaces he would have been anyway, and learning more about him as a character."

As to the question of whether it should have been Docter, a white man who grew up in Bloomington, Minnesota, who finally made a Pixar movie with a Black protagonist, Kiri Hart, a Black former Lucasfilm executive who joined Soul as an executive producer and is now producing other films at Pixar, says, "I won't say, 'I don't think Pete Docter should have made this movie,' because I'm really glad he did. I'm so glad it exists. I would like to see there be an equal amount of opportunity for a person of color to make a movie like this, and I'm cautiously optimistic that we are on that road."

As a director, Docter has told stories of the type rarely tackled by $200 million-plus studio movies, as in Up, which is largely about a widower's grief, and Inside Out, which is about an adolescent girl's sadness. "Pete doesn't ever pick an easy road," says Stanton, who started at Pixar three months before Docter and remains at the studio as a creative vp. "Pete's not interested in repeating anything. He wants to invent a new color every time." Within Pixar, Docter is known for a kind of childlike innocence. When he started making decent money at the studio as a single man, his first big splurge was a cotton candy machine. His second home is a treehouse he built in Lafayette, California.

Back in 2000, when he was frustrated at a meeting about Monsters, Inc., a producer at the studio called his wife, Amanda, to warn her, "Pete's in such a bad mood he swore in a meeting today." When he's ruminating on a problem, Docter takes long walks, usually by himself, with a few note cards and a pen. "He's not a quick thinker — he's a deep thinker," says Amanda, with whom Docter has two children, Nicholas, 24, and Elie, 22, and a Rottweiler named Moochie Spotlight. "In our marriage, if we have a disagreement, I'm fast and furious. And he's one to say, 'About that disagreement yesterday, here's my response.' "

Once it became clear Lasseter's sabbatical was in fact a permanent departure and Docter was installed in the role, there was relief around the studio, if not, necessarily, for Docter. He finished Soul in time for its planned summer 2020 theatrical release, despite having seven weeks of production left when the pandemic hit. Disney moved the release date back to November 2020 in hopes that theaters would be open, but when the COVID-19 numbers began spiking again in the fall, Iger called Docter and said he was going to put Soul on Disney+. "That was, just to be honest, a kick in the gut initially," Docter says. "We finaled every frame on the big screen. We wanted it to be experienced together. That's still sad. However, where we are now, boy, if he hadn't made that call, I don't know that people would've seen the movie at all."

Pixar's next three features were all greenlit before Docter assumed the CCO job — Luca, a coming-of-age adventure set in Italy directed by Enrico Casarosa, due this summer; Shi's movie, Turning Red, about a teenager dealing with a family curse that turns her into a giant red panda whenever she gets too excited, due in March 2022; and Lightyear, the origin story of Buzz Lightyear, directed by Angus MacLane, due in summer 2022. "In the past we had a big run of sequels, too many in a row," says Docter, whose feature green lights have not yet been publicly announced. "Now we have a lot of original stuff, which I'm personally excited about, but for financial safety we probably should have a few more sequels in there. Sometimes it's tough, because the creative projects have a life of their own, and they either take off or they don't."

The streaming service is turning out to be a place for experimentation, including Pixar's first original longform animated series, Win or Lose, due in 2023. Written and directed by story artists Carrie Hobson and Michael Yates, the series will tell a Rashomon-esque tale from the various points of view of a co-ed middle school softball team over the course of a season. There are also spinoff series from Cars (fall 2020) and Up (fall 2021) and a collection of mini-shorts called Pixar Popcorn, due in January. With the increasing importance of streaming to the studio, says Docter, "We were asked early this year to up our game and produce more. So we stepped up and we're basically doing as much for streaming as we are in theatrical release."

In some ways, the demand to produce for Disney+ has brought Pixar back to its more freewheeling early days, Docter says. "At the beginning, when we were doing Toy Story, we didn't know what we were doing," he says. "So people would be just off the street. 'You're going to be the art department manager.' Now we would never do that. First you'd have to go through three or four other positions and train. The streaming service has shaken that back up to the earlier days of, 'OK, we just have to take some chances and go.' "

Though Lasseter sometimes directed films while running the studio, Docter does not yet have plans to direct again. "The CCO job is not making films," he says. "It's guiding other people. I was initially worried that it would be like a tax, taking me away from what I really loved. But it's been surprisingly rewarding."

Docter, once one of the youngest animators at the studio, now draws from his 30 years of animation experience to advise younger filmmakers. "I can see their eyes light up and them recognize the truth of what I'm saying, and it helps them get somewhere, and that's been surprisingly fulfilling to me," he says. Whether that will be enough to sustain him forever — to soothe those inevitable tugs of existential ennui he so frequently explores onscreen — he can't yet say. "Whether it'll be enough in the long run, or if I'm going to be jonesing to get back to directing, I don't know. We'll have to see."
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: Charmed [Série TV - 1998]
lolomario

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Rechercher dans: Culture & Divertissements   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: Charmed [Série TV - 1998]    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Lun 24 Aoû 2020 - 15:50
Rose a balancé quelques tweets à l'encontre d'Alyssa

"Tu as volé #MeToo (un outil de communication brillant, pas un mouvement) à Tara [Burke, activiste). Tu as co-opté mon propre mouvement, "The Cultural Reset", pour la gloire, jalouse que j'ai dénoncé mon violeur."

"Tu gagnais 250 000 dollars par semaine sur Charmed. Tu as piqué une crise devant toute l'équipe, en criant "Ils ne me payent pas assez pour faire cette m**rde". Un comportement innaceptable au quotidien. J'ai pleuré à chaque fois que nous étions renouvelés parce que tu rendais le tournage toxique à mort."

source
http://www.allocine.fr/article/fichearticle_gen_carticle=18692389.html

Encore une preuve que ce n'était pas la folle entente sur les plateaux Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza 675824
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: Mulan [Disney - 2020]
Flounder69

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Rechercher dans: Les Films "Live" Disney   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: Mulan [Disney - 2020]    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Ven 28 Fév 2020 - 18:38
Fandango en parlait dans l'article posté plus haut. #MeToo est effectivement la raison de l'absence de Li Shang, pour éviter une relation avec un homme plus haut placé.

Le personnage de Shang a été divisé en deux nouveaux personnages: le mentor, le commandant Tung (Donnie Yen) et le jeune Chen Honghui (Yoson An), qui est nouvelle recrue comme Mulan afin qu'il soit un peu son égal.
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: Mulan [Disney - 2020]
Rwo

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Rechercher dans: Les Films "Live" Disney   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: Mulan [Disney - 2020]    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Ven 28 Fév 2020 - 18:32
Le dernier scandale du jour, c'est l'absence de Li Shang. L'argument du #MeToo est avancé (parce qu'un supérieur hiérarchique masculin est forcément un porc à la Weinstein, c'est bien connu), quand d'autres soupçonnent plutôt le souci de ne pas le faire passer pour homo ou bisexuel aux yeux du public chinois.

Je trouve juste marrant, de mon côté, que ça puisse lever une vague d'indignation et de boycott venant de fans féminines, quand le mois d'avant on nous bassinait avec Harley Quinn et autres films mettant en vedette des personnages féminins ou dirigés par des femmes, qui n'étaient pas assez mis en valeur.
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: Mulan [Disney - 2020]
Flounder69

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Rechercher dans: Les Films "Live" Disney   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: Mulan [Disney - 2020]    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Jeu 27 Fév 2020 - 22:21
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Mulanm10

Traduction rapidement faite de l'article de Fandango :

Fandango a écrit:
Cela fait plus de 20 ans que Mulan de Disney a conquis le cœur d'innombrables fans. Alors que le prochain film en prise de vues réelles sera comportera action, scénario, motivations, thèmes et bien sûr, inspiration et cœur similaires - le public peut, à bien des égards, attendre une expérience différente du classique de 1998. Après s'être aventuré en Nouvelle-Zélande pour visiter le tournage de Mulan, Fandango a appris comment et pourquoi certains éléments clés du film ont été modifiés directement des créateurs et acteurs.

Ce n'est pas seulement les temps qui ont changé qui ont eu un impact sur le film, qui débute le 27 mars (les billets sont maintenant en vente ici au Fandango). Les créateurs ont en fait revisité les nombreuses interprétations de Mulan au-delà du film de 1998, y compris le poème original "Ballade de Mulan" et ses variations au fil des ans. Ce processus n'était qu'une partie de ce qui a aidé à façonner ce film, ses personnages (et leur absence) et ses péripéties.

Ce guide aidera les fans à répondre à des questions telles que: Mulan aura-t-il un compagnon amusant? Ses ancêtres entreront-ils en jeu? Va-t-elle se couper les cheveux? À quel point le film sera-t-il drôle (et musical)? Découvrez-le ci-dessous.


Les cheveux de Mulan

Une scène emblématique du film d'animation est celle où Mulan se coupe les cheveux avec son épée lorsqu'elle s'apprête à s'enrôler dans l'armée impériale, se faisant passer pour un homme, à la place de son père. Dans ce film, cependant, Mulan gardera ses cheveux longs. Le producteur Jason Reed explique pourquoi. "Les guerriers chinois, les hommes guerriers portaient leurs cheveux longs", dit-il. "Pour elle de se couper les cheveux, cela la ferait ressembler plus à la femme qu'elle tente de masquer en réalité." Reed dit qu'il y avait eu une attention sur "l'exactitude culturelle". Il explique en outre: "Nous nous référons à son look de "princesse guerrière". Quand nous la voyons pour la première fois au début du film, comme une simple fille du village, ses cheveux sont en arrière mais en bas. Elle est très traditionnelle. Quand elle va dans l'armée, elle doit porter ses cheveux en nœud supérieur comme tous les hommes, alors elle se fond et ressemble à tout le monde. » Mais peut-être que la scène de la coupe de cheveux sera remplacée, en comparaison, par Mulan libérant ses cheveux. "Ses cheveux tombent, ils flottent dans le vent, elle est déchire!"


Le compagnon amusant

Qui est Mulan sans son dragon Mushu (joué par Eddie Murphy dans le film d'animation) et son cricket? Les fans sont sur le point de le découvrir. "De toute évidence, Mushu est un personnage bien-aimé et l'un des éléments les plus mémorables du film d'animation", explique Reed. "Il s'avère que le public chinois traditionnel ne pensait pas particulièrement que c'était la meilleure interprétation du dragon dans sa culture, que le dragon était un signe de respect et un signe de force et de pouvoir, et ce genre d'utilisation comme un acolyte idiot n'a pas été très bien accueilli par le public chinois traditionnel. " Mais ne vous inquiétez pas les fans, Mulan aura un compagnon à ses côtés. "Il y aura une sorte d'associé mythologique dans le film, mais je ne dirai rien de plus que cela, sauf que ce n'est pas Mushu."



Les personnages

L'amoureux / commandant de Mulan, Li Shang, a été divisé en deux nouveaux personnages: son mentor, le commandant Tung (Donnie Yen) et son égal Chen Honghui (Yoson An). #MeToo, selon les producteurs, a joué un rôle dans cela, car les créateurs du film ont jugé inapproprié d'avoir un intérêt amoureux qui est également d'un rang plus élevé compte tenu du climat actuel. Le méchant du film d'animation Shan Yu est désormais également divisé en deux nouveaux personnages: le chef du Rouran Bori Khan (Jason Scott Lee) et la sorcière Xian Lang (Gong Li). Et, en plus de la mère et du père de Mulan, sa famille se compose également d’une sœur cadette (jouée par Xana Tang). Vous pouvez en savoir plus sur chaque personnage dans le guide de distribution des personnages Mulan de Fandango.


Les Rourans et les Chinois

Parce que le film en direct est destiné à être plus précis sur le plan historique et sensible à la culture, il a remplacé les Huns et les Mongols par des Rourans et des Chinois. L'acteur Jason Lee Scott, qui incarne le leader du Rouran Bori Khan, éclaire la décision. "Il faut faire très attention et c'est une question sensible sur l'histoire, de savoir qui va où et qui fini où", explique-t-il. "En faisant attention, on joue la sécurité". Il explique que son personnage est motivé pour regagner la fierté et la stature de Rouran après avoir été "envahi par les Chinois".

La musique

Les fans de Mulan peuvent probablement réciter des chansons comme "Comme un Homme" et "Une belle fille à aimer" . Mais parce que ce film n'est pas une comédie musicale, les airs peuvent se faire attendre de diverses manières. "Nous essayons de garder secrets certaines de nos astuces", explique Reed. "Cependant, je peux vous garantir qu'il y aura des chansons que vous reconnaîtrez et dont vous vous souviendrez dans le film." Mais ne vous attendez pas à des pauses dansées. "Ce ne sera pas une rupture en moment musical. Ils ne vont pas arrêter leurs entraînements et faire un gros numéro musical à la caméra. Cependant, il y a un certain nombre de chansons qui sont emblématiques du film et racontent une excellente version de l'histoire et elles nous sont très utiles dans la façon dont nous assemblons le film. " Selon l'acteur Yoson An, le public peut s'attendre à "une version plus réaliste de cette histoire" tout en incorporant des airs familiers d'une manière ou d'une autre.

 

La grand-mère hilarante de Mulan

Alors que la grand-mère de Mulan est un grand élément comique dans le film d'animation, elle ne sera pas présente dans celui-ci. "Nous nous sommes vraiment concentrés sur la relation avec la mère, le père et la sœur ", explique Reed. Mais peut-être que le père de Mulan incarne un peu le personnage de grand-mère que les fans aiment. "Son père la regarde faire tout ce chaos fou et il est super fier, et puis tout le monde est comme" Qu'est-ce que tu fais? " Et il dit," Oh ouais, c'est vrai. Tu ne devrais pas faire ça. "

 

L'humour

Alors, à quel point est drôle le nouveau Mulan? "Je dirais qu'il l'est un peu moins, mais toujours très drôle", explique Reed. "Je pense que nous nous sommes davantage penchés sur le film d'action / aventure. Il y a un soulagement comique, ce n'est pas aussi - vous ne rivaliserez jamais avec Eddie Murphy . On ne va pas battre ça, en termes de comédie brute. " Pourtant, il aura ses moments. "Nous avons ajouté quelques éléments de ce film et nous avons des scènes qui, bien qu’elles soient très réelles, vont faire rire beaucoup." L'actrice principale Yifei Liu dit: "Nous détenons les bons éléments aimants, mais parce que c'est une action en direct, nous avons de vraies émotions humaines dans notre esprit et notre corps." L'acteur Jason Scott Lee est optimiste quant aux éléments comiques: «Je pense que [les gens] vont être agréablement surpris par la valeur de divertissement de tous les acteurs de soutien, même s'ils ne sont pas comme Eddie Murphy.»

 

Petite Mulan

Le public n'a pas encore rencontré Mulan en petite fille… jusqu'à présent. "Nous commençons avec Mulan enfant. Nous voyons son esprit, nous voyons qu'elle n'est pas comme les autres enfants et nous voyons la difficulté qu'elle cause à ses parents, ce qui devient alors un thème du film du fait qu'elle ne s'intègre pas et qu'elle ne trouve pas sa place," révèle Reed. "Tout le monde est très inquiet pour elle. Elle a toutes ces grandes qualités mais elle ne fait pas les choses comme une jeune fille est censée le faire. Et ce n'est que lorsqu'elle est habillée en garçon que les gens ont encouragé ces choses en elle. "


Les ancêtres

L'une des scènes les plus emblématiques du film de 1998 est celle où les ancêtres sont réveillés par Mushu. Bien que la même scène ne se joue pas exactement, il peut y avoir un certain type de signe de tête. "Il y a une allusion à cela, ou une métaphore pour cela, en quelque sorte, qui se rapporte à ses ancêtres et à ses ancêtres", taquine le producteur exécutif Barrie M. Osborne. "C'est donc bien dans le film. Est- ce qu'on verra tous ses ancêtres prendre vie, vous devrez regarder le film pour le savoir. Mais il y est fait référence."


Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Mulan110

Source : DISNEY'S 'MULAN': THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE ANIMATED AND LIVE-ACTION MOVIES
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: Quel est le dernier film LIVE (hors catalogue Disney) que vous avez vu ?
Pat le bzh

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Rechercher dans: Culture & Divertissements   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: Quel est le dernier film LIVE (hors catalogue Disney) que vous avez vu ?    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Ven 24 Jan 2020 - 22:57
1917 prodigieux par son atmosphère.

Scandale . Un film choc sur l'univers du show business, avec ses pressions et humiliations /harcèlements .
Y'a pas que Harvey vienstein dis donc #metoo
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [PDG Disney] Bob Iger (2005-20??)
Vinc

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Rechercher dans: Buena Vista Street, Burbank   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [PDG Disney] Bob Iger (2005-20??)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Jeu 4 Oct 2018 - 19:30
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Xx6

Citation :
Bob Iger’s Bets Are Paying Off Big Time for Disney

Three or four times a year, Disney CEO and chairman Bob Iger crosses from his office on the Burbank, Calif., lot with a couple of fellow execs to Disney Animation Studios, where rooms have been prepared for them. In each, they are pitched a movie. Sometimes the films are no more than an idea, and the room just has some art boards and a director with a 15-minute plot outline. Others are more elaborate—the room for Frozen 2 included a video from a research trip to Norway, Iceland and Finland, a “tone reel” and a wall of index cards detailing themes and emotional threads. Sounds like fun—except that each room represents a $150 million bet on what, in four or five years, audiences will pay to see.

Iger, 67, is good at picking winners. This is, after all, the man who greenlighted America’s Funniest Home Videos. On his watch, Disney has released five of the top 10 grossing global hit movies of all time, selling a cumulative $8.4 billion worth of movie tickets. And not only did he sign off on those movies, he also spearheaded the purchase of the companies that made them, which requires prophetic skills of a whole different order. Apple CEO Tim Cook says Iger operates a lot like a tech-company CEO. “Both are trying to skate to where the puck is going and not where it is. We’re making calls years in advance.”

Of course, figuring out which films to make is a fundamental skill for any media mogul. What really distinguishes Iger from rival Hollywood CEOs—and what has insulated Disney from the vast shifts in viewing patterns that have battered others—is his conviction that an already gigantic company should keep getting bigger. While competitors mostly avoided risks at this scale, Iger spent lavishly to buy Pixar ($7.4 billion), Marvel ($4 billion) and Lucasfilm ($4 billion), giving Disney a lineup of moneymaking franchises that far outdistances competitors’.

Although some critics bemoan the sequelization of Hollywood, no one doubts that Iger’s moves have paid off. Audiences, most of the time, keep buying tickets. And “sequel” doesn’t actually do justice to Iger’s achievement: with the Marvel and Star Wars films, Disney has acquired entire fictional universes that can spawn lucrative new content in all directions. A Marvel movie character can power a new Disney theme-park ride, inspire a TV series and serve as the focus of a video game, all under the Disney tent.

More remarkable, in an industry of big egos, Iger’s relatively hands-off management style has allowed Disney to swallow these companies without masticating the qualities that make them unique. Industry observers say Iger’s collaborative approach has been critical to retaining the creative talent that made the properties worth buying—and in some cases, made those deals possible. (Iger famously took a Disney-Pixar relationship that had frayed under his predecessor and persuaded Steve Jobs to let Disney buy the animation powerhouse outright.)

When TIME set out to identify the most creatively successful companies in the world, candidates ranged from brilliant upstarts to household names. But even in that elite group, the Walt Disney Co. stands out. So far in 2018, Disney has released the top three U.S. box-office hits. And Iger has topped his own bigger-is-better strategy with a $71 billion deal to buy 21st Century Fox’s entertainment assets, bringing into the fold everything from Avatar to The Simpsons. Now the studio that began in the back of a real estate office by selling its first cartoon to one distributor in 1923 is poised to launch its own streaming service. By eliminating the middlemen and selling content directly to consumers, Disney will disrupt the disrupters. “I don’t think anybody else could do this but us, frankly,” says Iger.

In 2005, when Iger was named Disney’s sixth CEO, the company was in a rut. The brand felt dated, age-limited and low-quality. The previous CEO, the mercurial Michael Eisner, had some brilliant years and some not so brilliant, during the last five of which Disney stock fell by roughly a third. Iger was a veteran TV executive who had come to the company when it bought Cap Cities/ABC in 1996. Eisner’s deputy since 2000, he was seen by many as his faithful puppet.

Since Iger took control, however, the company’s market cap has grown fourfold, to $175 billion. It has delivered healthy total shareholder returns (488.5% vs. 212.6% for the S&P 500). Disney became the first company to put its shows on iTunes, and applied for over four times as many patents as before. Its theme parks, once reserved for Disney characters only, are full of Marvel, Pixar and Lucas attractions. More than 150 million people visited last year.

The successes have kept Iger bolted to the CEO chair in Burbank years longer than even he expected. Four times he has announced plans to retire, only to remain, outlasting several heirs apparent. He’s currently slated to retire in 2021, dashing (forever, says Iger) the dreams of friends, including Oprah Winfrey, who hoped he’d run for President as a business-friendly Democrat.

Wall Street has been happy to see Iger stay. “His record has been fantastic,” says Tim Nollen, an analyst at Macquarie Capital. “I think what he did right was recognize the company’s strengths and invest in those strengths.” Iger says the key to his strategy has been to put his money where the creators are. “Nothing is more important than the creators, the creative process and the creative output,” he says. “You’re basically making bets on people and ideas vs. anything else.”

He calls them bets, but Iger doesn’t really have a gambler’s style. He prefers to work as part of a syndicate that uses a well-tested system. The pitches at Disney Animation are more like long-running conversations than one-shot deals, an approach that feels relatively organic. “It’s not a big heavy discussion,” says Frozen‘s co-writer-director Jennifer Lee, who also runs the animation division. “By the time we arrive at what we feel is the right film to go next, he’s been on the journey with us the whole time and we’ve had a lot of smaller conversations. He definitely respects the process, that it’s an evolution.”

Iger’s franchise-heavy strategy also purposely leans toward favorites rather than artistic long shots. In a world where content is proliferating, he believes audiences opt for the most recognizable. “When consumers are faced with so much choice, it’s very helpful to them to know going in what something might be,” he says. Rather than creating movie stars, as the Hollywood enterprises of yore did, or elevating auteur-directors, as the Miramax-style studios did, Iger has focused on establishing brands. “He’s refined the business,” says Rupert Murdoch, executive co-chairman of Fox. “He built this thing around reliable franchises, whether it’s with Pixar, with Lucasfilm or with Marvel, which then play right into the theme parks and everything.”

Purchasing creative engines is not the same as dreaming them up—in the way that, say, Walt Disney did—but Iger’s ability to manage such enterprises has made his firm the go-to steward of cultural producers at a time of upheaval, when creators are looking for a safe harbor. How (other than fat checks) does he persuade people to hand over their brainchildren? “The negotiation is the small part of it,” says Apple’s Cook. “The big part is the vision.”

Former superagent Michael Ovitz, who details his short and unhappy tenure as a Disney CEO-in-waiting in his new book Who Is Michael Ovitz?, did deals for clients when Iger was head of ABC. He says Iger was the same kind of negotiator he is a CEO. “He’s quiet and strong and doesn’t pound the table,” Ovitz tells TIME, “but he gets his point across.” And when Iger lays out his vision, most people, from his board to his shareholders to Steve Jobs, assent.

Iger’s vision for Fox—along with some $71 billion—is what helped him land his biggest fish yet. “Rupert believed that where it was at the time, which was August of 2017, that Fox wasn’t necessarily as well set up for long-term success in the businesses that were transforming right before his eyes,” he says. Curiously, Murdoch puts it slightly differently. “Bob called into my place one day and we got talking, and he said, ‘Well, look, perhaps we should put everything together,'” says Murdoch, who was struggling to increase his company’s stake in the U.K.’s Sky at the time. “I thought it was a good idea. He probably hit me at a moment when I was frustrated.” (In the end, Sky went to Comcast, and Fox is selling its portion of the company.)

With the purchase of Fox, Iger is mustering the forces first grounded in creativity to take on the forces first grounded in delivery, such as Netflix and YouTube. In 2019, Disney hopes to launch its streaming service. This is a leap of faith of Summit Plummet proportions. The biggest generator of the company’s revenues is TV. Until recently, Disney sold its programming—especially ESPN—to cable companies for reliably large sums. But those profits are shrinking. ESPN has lost 11 million subscribers since 2013. More viewers abandon cable every month, while Netflix has 125 million customers, Amazon Prime 100 million and YouTube 1.8 billion monthly users. Disney’s hope is to lure people to its stream with content that can’t be found anywhere else. As tech upstarts pour vats of money into creating original programming—Netflix is spending $8 billion this year—Disney is sitting on a mother lode.

Iger thinks he knows how to coax consumers who already pay for one streaming service to either add another or switch to Disney’s. “We’re going to do something different,” he says. “We’re going to give audiences choice.” There are thousands of barely watched movies on Netflix, and Iger figures that people don’t like to pay for what they don’t use. So families can buy only a Disney stream, which will offer Pixar, Marvel, Lucas, Disney-branded programming. Sports lovers can opt just for an ESPN stream. Hulu, of which Disney will own a 60% stake after it buys Fox (and perhaps more if it can persuade Comcast to sell its share), will beef up ABC’s content with Fox Searchlight and FX and other Fox assets. “To fight [Amazon and Netflix], you’ve got to put a lot of product on the table,” says Murdoch. “You take what Disney’s got in sports, in family, in general entertainment—they can put together a pretty great offer.”

While folks stumble over themselves to praise Iger’s vision, and his execution thereof, fewer of them call him a visionary. His focus on brands has made him much less likely to be seen as the kind of artistic guru who gets thanked tearfully from the stage at the Academy Awards. “I think it’s safe to say what he does well is management,” says Brian Wieser, an analyst at Pivotal Research. “He’s never tried to be the thought leader in any particular sphere. There’s no one thing of which you’d say he was the oracle.”

This is not meant to be an insult. Finding talented people and setting up an organizational structure that allows them to do what they do well requires a particular form of wisdom. “He doesn’t lose anybody he doesn’t want to lose,” Ovitz says of Iger, who is reputed to regard his executives as more expendable than his creatives. “He gives them plenty of rope, and when there isn’t performance, he makes a change.” Adhering to this structure requires discipline, which, along with impeccable grooming, Iger is famous for; he rises at 4:15 a.m. and follows a fitness regimen that sometimes includes working out with his eyes closed as a kind of meditation. The discipline is both innate and acquired, largely by setbacks. “How you process failure at a company that thrives on great creativity is critical,” Iger says. “You can’t wallow. You have to know how to absorb creative disappointments, knowing that there are inevitabilities to that.”

Having a leader who is willing to insulate key creative people from the vicissitudes of business has helped Disney successfully incorporate its prominent acquisitions. They have not been Disneyfied. Marvel movies are not all of a sudden family friendly (at least not by Disney standards). Pixar movies have not been required to add princesses. Most of the people who ran the companies before Disney bought them still run them (with the exception of John Lasseter, who was ousted in June in the wake of #MeToo). “I’ve been watching him with his people and with Fox people; he’s clearly got great leadership qualities,” says Murdoch.”He listens very carefully and he decides something and it’s done. People respect that.”

Given what he’s achieved at Disney, Iger gets graded on a tough curve—and it’s about to get tougher. The animation division has lost its chief in Lasseter, and it remains to be seen how that changes the culture. Many of ESPN’s sports deals will need to be renegotiated within five years, and they’re only getting pricier. There’s evidence of franchise fatigue: the newest Star Wars film, Solo, did not blow the doors off the box office. And Iger still has to find someone to take over his job by 2021. On the plus side, fans will get a chance to fly the Millennium Falcon at the new Star Wars Land at both Disney World and Disneyland next year. Visits to the $5.5 billion Shanghai Disney park exceeded expectations. Over at the studio, director Lasse Hallstrom has taken on The Nutcracker, Tim Burton has taken on Dumbo, and Elsa and Anna have agreed to come back for Frozen 2.

Nobody is more excited by any of these developments than Iger, who has an almost boyish enthusiasm for what he does. He’s a consumer. He’s a fan. Before our interview he was watching the Sophia Loren—Clark Gable movie It Started in Naples in his office. The previous night he was listening to Queen, Nicki Minaj’s new album. (“I’m not prudish,” he says, “but she’s taken explicit to a whole new level.”) Iger insists that he’s not creative, which may be why he is such an adept partner of those who are. “My perfect day is a day where I’m engaged the most in creative processes and with creators,” he says. “Any day that has none of that is a bad day.”

Time - 15 octobre 2018.


http://time.com/5415019/bob-iger-disney/
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)
Crystal

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Rechercher dans: Disneyland Paris   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Mer 26 Sep 2018 - 22:25
@Jake Sully a écrit:
Je me demande qui est le plus sexiste: celui qui ne fait que décrire un fait à l'heure de #metoo, ou celui qui aurait geulé que "c'est une honte qu'une femme n'est pas été retenue parmi les deux ambassadeur à leur de l'égalité des sexes". Wink

Mon propos initial n'était en rien sexiste. C'était juste un constat de ce qui allé se passer au regard du contexte actuel sur ces sujets. (et force est de constater que j'avais raison).


Sauf que peut-être que personne n'aurait gueulé, parce que comme l'ont déjà expliqué plusieurs personnes sur ce sujet, l'historique du programme ambassadeur a largement démontré son équité depuis des décennies.
Le dernier couple non-mixte masculin remonte à 2010, et c'est pas parce que toi tu ne t'es intéressé à la problématique du harcèlement sexuel et de la place trop importante des hommes dans le milieu professionnel (puisque c'est ce dont il est question avec #MeToo ) qu'on ne discutait pas/revendiquait pas déjà l'équité en 2010. Et pourtant, de mémoire, personne ne s'était offusqué de ce choix.

Donc oui, tes remarques sont sexistes, et j'ajouterai, lourdingues vu que tu reviens sans cesse dessus, alors même que tout le monde t'explique que c'est insultant, et sexiste. Y compris les concernées.

Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)
Jake Sully

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Rechercher dans: Disneyland Paris   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Mer 26 Sep 2018 - 16:19
Quand tu arrives à ce niveau là de la compétition (la finale), les compétences tu les as Wink . Le reste c'est uniquement le choix de la Direction. Et clairement, à l'heure de #MeToo et de la présidence de #PowellPower, il y avait 99% de chance que la seule candidate restante soit prise, d'une part parce qu'elle a certainement les compétences pour par rapport aux autres candidates jugées sur les tour de sélection précédent, mais aussi parce que c'était la seule femme restante dans le dernier carré.
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)
Jake Sully

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Rechercher dans: Disneyland Paris   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Mer 26 Sep 2018 - 16:11
Je me demande qui est le plus sexiste: celui qui ne fait que décrire un fait à l'heure de #metoo, ou celui qui aurait geulé que "c'est une honte qu'une femme n'est pas été retenue parmi les deux ambassadeur à leur de l'égalité des sexes". Wink

Mon propos initial n'était en rien sexiste. C'était juste un constat de ce qui allé se passer au regard du contexte actuel sur ces sujets. (et force est de constater que j'avais raison).
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)
Mr Toad

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Rechercher dans: Disneyland Paris   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Jeu 20 Sep 2018 - 22:10
@zelko a écrit:
@Jake Sully a écrit:
Une nana pour trois mecs... autant dire que la fille est quasiment certaine d'être l'un des deux futurs ambassadeurs de DLP (#metoo #balancetonporc #egalitedessexe #girlpowelpower)


C’est certain et vu ses compétences,elle le sera.


Ah bon ? Laughing

Je repète mon poste juste au-dessus, et Dash ne dira pas le contraire, le Programme Ambassadeur ne se base absolument pas sur le sexe des candidats. Tous les 2 ans vous dites la même chose et nous avons pourtant eu deux fois un duo du même sexe.

Si elle est élue (ce que je lui souhaite), c'est parce qu'elle aura été l'une des mieux qualifiées pour représenter la culture et les valeurs de l'entreprise, et non pas parce que c'est une femme. Je trouve ça limite réducteur !
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)
zelko

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Rechercher dans: Disneyland Paris   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Jeu 20 Sep 2018 - 19:54
@Jake Sully a écrit:
Une nana pour trois mecs... autant dire que la fille est quasiment certaine d'être l'un des deux futurs ambassadeurs de DLP (#metoo #balancetonporc #egalitedessexe #girlpowelpower)


C’est certain et vu ses compétences,elle le sera.
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)
Mr Toad

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Rechercher dans: Disneyland Paris   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Jeu 20 Sep 2018 - 19:18
@Skyam a écrit:
Mais le mouvement #MeToo est passé par là depuis.
Je suis d'accord avec Jake Sully, il est possible que Disney élise une ambassadrice cette année pour être politiquement correct et ne pas s'attirer les foudres de certains groupes de pression.

Après, ce ne sera peut-être pas le cas, mais ce n'est pas quelque chose qu'il faut écarter non plus pour une entreprise qui a une telle visibilité. Il ne faut pas oublier que ce sont des ambassadeurs qui vont être élus, et donc représenter la destination sur les réseaux sociaux, à la télévision... et que beaucoup de gens vont les voir et se faire la réflexion s'il n'y a pas de parité.

La seule chose que j'espère, c'est que si Joana Afonso Santiago est choisie, elle le sera uniquement pour ses compétences.


Si la divison Parks & Resorts suivait un quelconque mouvement politique et social, ça se saurait ! Le jury du programme Ambassadeur fait sa sélection sans aucun préjugé, sans discrimination, sans scénario, et se base sur un casting rigoureux durant lequel différents tests, mises en situation,... permet de faire ressortir ceux qui représenteront au mieux la société.

Donc ça ne sert à rien de faire des plans sur la comète !
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)
Skyam

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Rechercher dans: Disneyland Paris   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Jeu 20 Sep 2018 - 18:06
Mais le mouvement #MeToo est passé par là depuis.
Je suis d'accord avec Jake Sully, il est possible que Disney élise une ambassadrice cette année pour être politiquement correct et ne pas s'attirer les foudres de certains groupes de pression.

Après, ce ne sera peut-être pas le cas, mais ce n'est pas quelque chose qu'il faut écarter non plus pour une entreprise qui a une telle visibilité. Il ne faut pas oublier que ce sont des ambassadeurs qui vont être élus, et donc représenter la destination sur les réseaux sociaux, à la télévision... et que beaucoup de gens vont les voir et se faire la réflexion s'il n'y a pas de parité.

La seule chose que j'espère, c'est que si Joana Afonso Santiago est choisie, elle le sera uniquement pour ses compétences.
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [PDG Disney] Bob Iger (2005-20??)
Vinc

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Rechercher dans: Buena Vista Street, Burbank   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [PDG Disney] Bob Iger (2005-20??)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Jeu 20 Sep 2018 - 16:23
The Hollywood Reporter échange avec Bob Iger sur différents sujets dont sa succession, les différentes "affaires" chez Pixar, Marvel, ESPN et ABC, le nouveau service de streaming, le rachat de la Fox et la situation de la franchise Star Wars :

Citation :
Bob Iger Talks on Disney's Streaming Service, 'Roseanne,' James Gunn and a Coming ‘Star Wars' “Slowdown”

The Disney CEO and most powerful person in entertainment opens up about his plan for a Netflix rival, ESPN’s politics problem and how #MeToo has changed his company

Walt Disney Co. CEO Bob Iger remains the most powerful person in entertainment, only adding to his empire with $71 billion of 21st Century Fox assets. But his dominance is one of the few things that hasn't changed since THR published 2017's list of Hollywood's most influential figures.

Along with Disney-Fox, 2018 saw AT&T win a judge's blessing to acquire Time Warner, spawning a new entity whose chief, John Stankey, arrives at No. 4. There were the milestones: Filmmakers Ryan Coogler (No. 93) and Jon M. Chu (No. 97) brought inclusive movies to the multiplex, smashing records along the way. And there are the movements: #MeToo and Time's Up drove a reckoning. Out of work, and off the THR 100, are John Lasseter, Roy Price, Brett Ratner and, just this month, Leslie Moonves. His spot has gone to Ronan Farrow, whose reporting took the CBS chief down. White men make up 70 percent of this list — but the sands are shifting, more rapidly than ever, as THR takes stock of Hollywood power now.

If Hollywood has become a kill-or-be-killed battleground, Bob Iger is the lead hunter.

Starting with Pixar in 2006, the Walt Disney Co. CEO has bulked up his company into a $160 billion content behemoth with the tools — Marvel heroes, Star Wars droids and, thanks to June's $71.3 billion acquisition of most of 21st Century Fox, a trove of new networks and IP — to take on much larger digital giants like Amazon, Apple and Facebook. Iger, 68, tops the THR 100 for the third year in a row, with Disney revenue up 7 percent to $15.2 billion and operating income up 5 percent to $4.2 billion in the most recent quarter. But he's not without challenges. A risky streaming service, set to launch in 2019 and aimed directly at Netflix, will cost billions, and the erosion of cable TV subscribers drags on the once-untouchable networks business.

At the same time, the integration of Fox assets (and executives) and the scandals that led to the forced exits of John Lasseter at Disney/Pixar (harassment), John Skipper at ESPN (drugs), Roseanne Barr at ABC and James Gunn at Marvel (both over offensive tweets) raise culture questions. And there's the issue of who will replace Iger when (or if?) he finally retires.

In a talk with THR editorial director Matthew Belloni, Iger discussed his plan for Disney "to not only survive but to thrive in a world that doesn't look anything like the world that existed just a few years ago."

Amid all the industry upheaval, from your seat, what is the content industry going to look like in five years ?

You call it upheaval, I guess that's one way to describe it. I believe we have to look at this as opportunity versus threat. Meaning I've tried to manage this company … in a way that enables us to not only survive but to thrive in a world that doesn't look anything like the world that existed just a few years ago.

How, specifically ?

There are three ways to do that. The first is make great content. And this is very relevant to the Fox acquisition. The second is to be incredibly innovative about how you bring that content to market. By the way, there isn't a better example than Netflix. The third is to be truly global in nature.

The streaming service advances the second and third goals.

It’s a direct relationship with customers: the ability to provide more customized, personalized experiences; new ways to monetize; a proximity to a customer that doesn’t have intermediaries. You're going to see growth in direct-to-consumer businesses. You're probably going to see less channel watching; we're already seeing that. You're probably going to see less bundling of channels and more selling of specific brands, programs, etc.

How do you see the recent interest in premium content from the digital giants ?

I'm impressed with what has been accomplished at Netflix and Amazon. But none of them is either Disney or Marvel. Or Pixar. Or Star Wars or National Geographic or FX or Searchlight or Avatar — I could go on. So we enter the business that they're in, in many respects, with an advantage from a content perspective that will enable us to focus on quality rather than just volume.

AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson recently compared Netflix to Walmart. Do you agree ?

Well, I happen to like Walmart; we do a lot of business with them. So maybe I'd say it a different way. They're a volume play with a lot of quality within their volume. And we're gonna be a quality play with enough volume and enough scale to provide the consumer with a good price-to-value relationship.

That takes investment. Do you anticipate a Netflix-type increase in spending ?

No. First of all, I don't know what Netflix is spending. You may know more than I do. If you really look across all of our businesses and you include ESPN and ABC and ABC News and what we're buying with Fox, we probably spend upwards of what they're spending. It's just that we're distributing differently. So the pivot for us is not necessarily substantially more spending, it's substantially different distribution. But while we're migrating to new distribution models, we have to spend enough [to populate] the new distribution until we can move content on the older ones over.

Ken Ziffren wrote a recent piece for Hollywood Reporter estimating a couple billion dollars of revenue from various windows will go away when you put this content into the new streaming service.

Two things are happening here. We're weaning ourselves off licensing revenue from third parties. That kicks in, really, in 2019, when the movie studio output, which was licensed to Netflix, will cease in terms of new films. At the same time, we are investing more in content to seize these direct-to-consumer businesses before we can move content from the more traditional platforms over. So there's more spend in production and there's less licensing revenue. There will be an impact on our bottom line in fiscal '19 because of what I just described, and it's with the full support of the Disney board because we all believe that the reality of transformation is staring us in the face, and we have to transform with it. In order to transform successfully, it means that you're going to go through a period of time where you've reduced your profitability somewhat. It's the right thing because we're playing the long game and not the short.

The Fox deal has brought a lot of new people into the company. How much does the question of who will succeed you impact the discussion of how to integrate these people ?

Very good question. We’re going to take the best people from both companies and that's who's gonna basically be on the playing field for us. Meaning, talent will prevail. Fox Searchlight is a great example. You look at FX, NatGeo. Yeah, you’re buying libraries and brands, but you're also buying the people. I'm not gonna talk about specific people right now except to say that I've met with virtually the entire senior management team at Fox and I'm not only fully engaged with them on what the possibilities for them might be but I'm excited about the prospects.

Rupert Murdoch will be one of your biggest shareholders, are you prepared for him wanting to get you on the phone at all hours ?

Rupert's been able to get me on the phone whenever he wanted to anyway. (Laughs.) I've had a good relationship with Rupert over the years and it's been one of mutual respect. I'm not in any way talking about politics, but he's impressed me with his guts and his vision. If he's got an idea or two as a shareholder that he wants to give me, that's not necessarily bad news.

He may think ABC News is too liberal.

I'm not worried about that at all. He's smarter than that. Plus he's a competitor in that regard.

You've had shake-ups at the various businesses this past year. How has ESPN changed specifically, if at all ?

I have nothing but praise for the job Jimmy Pitaro has done at ESPN. There's been a big debate about whether ESPN should be focused more on what happens on the field of sport than what happens in terms of where sports is societally or politically. And Jimmy felt that the pendulum may have swung a little bit too far away from the field. And I happen to believe he was right. And it's something, by the way, that I think John Skipper had come to recognize as well. But Jimmy coming in fresh has had the
ability to address it, I think, far more aggressively and effectively. He has brought back some balance.

How involved do you get in decisions to cancel Roseanne at ABC or fire James Gunn at Marvel ?

I would say there is a blend of my helping to make the decision to my supporting the decisions that have been made. Roseanne was completely unanimous. We discussed how it would be communicated and when because there were a number of entities that had to be properly filled in, but the decision was completely unanimous. The James Gunn decision was brought to me as a unanimous decision of a variety of executives at the studio and I supported it.

There was backlash. You still support it ?

I haven't second-guessed their decision.

Has the culture at Pixar changed at all in the past eight months since the exit of John Lasseter ?

Any time that you change leadership there is an inevitable cultural shift. There was a cultural shift at Disney when I took over for Michel Eisner after 21 years. John Lasseter was in his role for a long time, had an enormous influence on both the culture and the creativity of Pixar, and so of course in John leaving there is inevitable and was an inevitable cultural shift. To get into the details, I'd prefer not to.

What has changed within Disney as a whole as a result of the #MeToo movement ?

I don’t want to talk about anybody, specifically, but it's critical for us as leaders in this industry to create safe environments for people who have been victims of abuse to speak up and feel safe about speaking up and for others who have witnessed abuse to do the same. It's critical. As difficult as this time may seem, it's high time that we all woke up to the need to protect the people that work for us and work with us.

How are you doing that ?

First of all, you have to address specific issues with people, but beyond that, you have to make sure that you’re applying one standard to the company for all. There aren't two standards based on title, rank, importance, talent, whatever. Second, you've got to communicate very, very effectively to people that if they are a victim, if they have witnessed this, they must come forward because in not doing so they are only perpetuating an unsafe work environment, and that's not good.

How is Marvel going to absorb Fox’s X-Men franchise? Is Kevin Feige going to oversee everything ?

I think it only makes sense. I want to be careful here because of what's been communicated to the Fox folks, but I think they know. It only makes sense for Marvel to be supervised by one entity. There shouldn't be two Marvels.

So Deadpool could become an Avenger ?

Kevin's got a lot of ideas. I'm not suggesting that's one of them. But who knows?

Many believe Disney should pump the breaks and not put out a Star Wars movie each year.

I made the timing decision, and as I look back, I think the mistake that I made — I take the blame — was a little too much, too fast. You can expect some slowdown, but that doesn't mean we're not gonna make films. J.J. [Abrams] is busy making [Episode] IX. We have creative entities, including [Game of Thrones creators David] Benioff and [D.B.] Weiss, who are developing sagas of their own, which we haven't been specific about. And we are just at the point where we're gonna start making decisions about what comes next after J.J.'s. But I think we're gonna be a little bit more careful about volume and timing. And the buck stops here on that.

Finally, some Disneyland purists are upset that there's going to be booze for sale in Star Wars Land.

We have to be careful we don't let people drink and then go on Autopia. (Laughs.)

Funny. Walt did specifically say no booze at Disneyland.

Yeah, except I think Walt had a nip or two in his apartment at night. (Laughs.) I am a big believer in tradition. This just seemed like one of those traditions that if we changed it the empire wasn't gonna crumble.

The Hollywood Reporter - 20 septembre 2018.
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)
Dimitri

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Rechercher dans: Disneyland Paris   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Mer 19 Sep 2018 - 16:00
@Jake Sully a écrit:
Une nana pour trois mecs... autant dire que la fille est quasiment certaine d'être l'un des deux futurs ambassadeurs de DLP (#metoo #balancetonporc #egalitedessexe #girlpowelpower)
Je me suis dit la meme chose...

Et je vois mal deux garçons ambassadeur de nos jours...

Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)
Lalou

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Rechercher dans: Disneyland Paris   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Mer 19 Sep 2018 - 14:48
Parce que le monde en 2018 est trop axé sur du politiquement correct et que si c'est deux mec qui passent, tu va avoir des con, qui ne regardent pas plus loin que le bout de leurs nez, en mode #Metoo et compagnie qui vont dire que c'est une honte que Disney s'en tamponne de l'égalité homme femme etc etc.
Donc du coup si Disneyland paris veut faire du politiquement correct, jake n'a pas tout à fait tord.
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)
Jake Sully

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Rechercher dans: Disneyland Paris   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: [2022-2023] Le programme Ambassadeur Disney (présentation, nouveaux Ambassadeurs...)    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Mer 19 Sep 2018 - 14:20
Une nana pour trois mecs... autant dire que la fille est quasiment certaine d'être l'un des deux futurs ambassadeurs de DLP (#metoo #balancetonporc #egalitedessexe #girlpowelpower)
Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Ico_fr18Sujet: John Lasseter en congés pour comportements inappropriés
Invité

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Rechercher dans: Buena Vista Street, Burbank   Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Doc12Sujet: John Lasseter en congés pour comportements inappropriés    Tag metoo sur Disney Central Plaza Horlog11Ven 29 Juin 2018 - 8:42
Une ancienne employée dresse le constat accablant d'une culture sexiste chez Pixar et fait état d'une omerta concernant les comportements de Lasseter:

Citation :
Elle explique avoir été une des nombreuses victimes de son comportement (harcèlement sexuel et contacts physiques non désirés), y compris en public. Cassandra Smolcic explique qu'il "était clair que nous [elle de nombreuses autres femmes du studio, NDRL] étions pour lui des objets sexuels".

Elle confirme ce qu'avaient évoqué certains articles dès la fin 2017 : le comportement de Lasseter était très largement connu, y compris par la hiérarchie du studio. Par exemple, un supérieur lui a annoncé peu de temps après son arrivée dans l'équipe de Cars 2 qu'elle serait exclue des réunions hebdomadaires du département artistique. La raison invoquée par ce supérieur : Lasseter "avait des difficultés à se contrôler" face aux jeunes employées.


Citation :
Outre des comportements, Cassandra Smolcic explique que des femmes qui remettaient en question les leads masculins se voyaient remisées au placard, écartées des projets suivants ou même renvoyées.
Bien évidemment, le studio comportait aussi à l'époque des femmes aux postes de lead. Mais pour Cassandra Smolcic, elles devaient souvent elles aussi rester en retrait et rentrer dans le rang, si elles tenaient à leur poste et leur réputation. Un exemple concret est cité, avec une lead qui demandait à ses supérieurs davantage de ressources pour boucler un projet délicat. Ignorée par la hiérarchie, elle a fini en burn-out, remplacée par un homme... A qui l'on a donné les ressources qu'elle avait réclamées.


https://byrslf.co/pixars-sexist-boys-club-9d621567fdc9
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